backonpointePlease read my FAQ before sending me a question.

I'm a college student and a dancer, and I'm working to lose fat, gain muscle, become more fit... and help others do the same!

My Ask Box is always open to questions, suggestions, or if you just need to talk. If you'd like something to be answered privately, just let me know in the message. (Note: anonymous questions cannot be answered privately.)

I track the "backonpointe" tag!

Are you in recovery and reading Back On Pointe? Here are tips on staying safe while browsing. Stay safe and sane!

Advertisements



Advertise on Back On Pointe!



aspiringdoctors:

Someone figure out how to make a pizza out of this stuff so we can have it all.

(Source: symphonyofawesomeness, via fresherfinerfiercer)

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!
2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.
3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.
4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.
5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.
6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.
7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.
8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.
9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.
SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.
This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!

2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.

3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.

4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.

5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.

6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.

7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.

8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.

9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.

SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252

(via deadliftdolly)

mentally-illectric:

things i needed to hear in health class:

  • puberty might make you squishier and its ok
  • vaginas have a smell and it’s a ok
  • all kinds of people with all kinds of bodies have gr8 sex
  • genitals do not all look the same and variety is rad
  • people have stretch marks sometimes
  • people have pimples on their butts sometimes
  • people have cellulite sometimes
  • gender =/= sex
  • sex =/= scary danger FEAR
  • bodies aren’t scary or gross or sacred 
  • everything is ok

(via sophspiration)

heyfranhey:

Why Do My Knees Hurt During Lunges?

Kai Wheeler writes:

If you are someone who experiences knee pain during lunges this video will benefit you. There can be many factors that influence knee pain during exercise but I have identified the three most common issues I encounter with my clients. I will show you how to restore tight hip flexors, improve proper weight distribution, strengthen the core stabilizer muscles and finally I will cover the mechanics of a lunge.

“hi! so today at dance I almost fainted and was dry heaving(I sat out obviously) and I realized that I have been getting tired very easily lately. I was wondering if you knew any cardio things that will make me tire less easily? thanks a bunch :) xx”
-electrihc

That sounds terrifying!

The big thing that jumps to my mind is making sure you’re okay on a day-to-day basis. Are you drinking enough water? (Remember that when you’re active, you need more than the basic recommended amount.) Make sure you have a water bottle with you in class (and refill it before each class). It’s also a good idea to mix up your water with something full of electrolytes, such as coconut water, Pedialyte (which you’ll find in the baby section of a grocery store), or a drink mix.

Also, are you getting enough calories? Really, though, are you? Not what you’ve decided is enough, but how many you actually need? Check out this post (warning for calories and unhealthy eating talk) for help figuring out your daily calorie needs.

If you’re fueling yourself correctly, then we may have a stamina issue. And it can be complicated to figure out what you need since different dance types are different types of cardio when you get right down to it. If you’re doing a style like contemporary, where you tend to be going for a long time without breaks, I’d suggest a half hour (up to an hour) on a rowing machine or elliptical to build long-term endurance. If you’re doing something like ballet, where there are bursts of high-power dancing followed by more gentle dancing or even a complete stop, I’d suggest doing HIIT on a treadmill. HIIT will build your stamina for knock-down, drag-out intense dancing where you have to go from 0 to 60 quickly.

I hope all of this can help you figure stuff out so you never have to feel that way in class again. <3

Edit: people have brought up that this could be an iron deficiency. I have never dealt with an iron deficiency, so it didn’t come to mind. Check with your doctor about possible iron supplements!

fly to Top next »
Athenability
Design by Athenability
Powered by Tumblr