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poeticyogi:

15 Minute Morning Yoga to Wake Up..

I know how hard it is to want to exercise in the mornings but not have any time because of your job. Sometimes we need that boost to wake us up and give us energy for the day that comes ahead of us…So here is a (15Min) morning yoga practice. ONLY 15 MINS! and you can feel awake and calm before going to work! :)

(Source: youtube.com)

startersteps:

Shaking Off “Gymtimidation”
If you’re making a new commitment to exercise, you’ll probably be active around other people, and that can cause anxiety. You may worry because you have a large weight-loss goal, get winded easily, or you can’t lift much weight. You may even have been the target of mean-spirited comments from others.
Unfortunately, the world has a generous helping of jerks in it. You still have to look out for yourself, and that may mean getting a little uncomfortable. Here are some suggestions to ease the way:
Wear earphones while you exercise: Well, not if you’re riding a bike outside, but then you’ll be sailing past any haters, anyway. Especially in the gym, though earphones — plus favorite music, a great (or just plain fun) audiobook, or some podcasts from a favorite show — can help you tune out the world and focus on your workout. Music has even been shown to enhance performance.
Map out a plan before you hit the gym: Know exactly what you’re doing before you get to the gym. It could be as simple as a list of exercises you want to do, or as complicated as the order and other details about them. Bonus: you have a checklist to help you see what you’re accomplishing while you’re there. (And keeping a log of your activities, even if it’s just dated lists in a manila folder, can help you stick with your plan and improve it, too. Here are some ideas for things you can keep track of.)
It’s really true: the people who matter don’t mind, and the people who mind don’t matter. Sometimes the gym seems like an obstacle course of people who are better at everything and eyeing you critically. Appearances can be deceiving. The most capable, consistent, and knowledgeable gym-goers are almost always friendly, enthusiastic, and interested in helping others share their enjoyment of exercise. In other words, the best people help build others up — they don’t tear others down.
Exactly how fast you move or how much you lift doesn’t mean much outside of formal competition. For almost all of us, the most important part is whether we can do more — or feel better — than we did yesterday, or last week or last year. No human will ever beat a cheetah in a sprint, but that’s OK, because our job is being good humans. (And when the distances get longer, the tables turn!) This is one reason it helps to find activities you enjoy. Enjoying your exercise makes it easier to focus on what’s really important: how you are getting better over time.
This is clearly an image from an ad campaign (others in this style include a swimmer racing a dolphin and a soccer player facing off against a spider goal-tender), but I don’t know the source — please let me know if you recognize it!
Do you have some favorite tips and tricks for keeping your focus?

startersteps:

Shaking Off “Gymtimidation”

If you’re making a new commitment to exercise, you’ll probably be active around other people, and that can cause anxiety. You may worry because you have a large weight-loss goal, get winded easily, or you can’t lift much weight. You may even have been the target of mean-spirited comments from others.

Unfortunately, the world has a generous helping of jerks in it. You still have to look out for yourself, and that may mean getting a little uncomfortable. Here are some suggestions to ease the way:

  • Wear earphones while you exercise: Well, not if you’re riding a bike outside, but then you’ll be sailing past any haters, anyway. Especially in the gym, though earphones — plus favorite music, a great (or just plain fun) audiobook, or some podcasts from a favorite show — can help you tune out the world and focus on your workout. Music has even been shown to enhance performance.
  • Map out a plan before you hit the gym: Know exactly what you’re doing before you get to the gym. It could be as simple as a list of exercises you want to do, or as complicated as the order and other details about them. Bonus: you have a checklist to help you see what you’re accomplishing while you’re there. (And keeping a log of your activities, even if it’s just dated lists in a manila folder, can help you stick with your plan and improve it, too. Here are some ideas for things you can keep track of.)
  • It’s really true: the people who matter don’t mind, and the people who mind don’t matter. Sometimes the gym seems like an obstacle course of people who are better at everything and eyeing you critically. Appearances can be deceiving. The most capable, consistent, and knowledgeable gym-goers are almost always friendly, enthusiastic, and interested in helping others share their enjoyment of exercise. In other words, the best people help build others up — they don’t tear others down.

Exactly how fast you move or how much you lift doesn’t mean much outside of formal competition. For almost all of us, the most important part is whether we can do more — or feel better — than we did yesterday, or last week or last year. No human will ever beat a cheetah in a sprint, but that’s OK, because our job is being good humans. (And when the distances get longer, the tables turn!) This is one reason it helps to find activities you enjoy. Enjoying your exercise makes it easier to focus on what’s really important: how you are getting better over time.

This is clearly an image from an ad campaign (others in this style include a swimmer racing a dolphin and a soccer player facing off against a spider goal-tender), but I don’t know the source — please let me know if you recognize it!

Do you have some favorite tips and tricks for keeping your focus?

(via the-exercist)

hangtightwmarc:

Cardio/Strength City Workout (NEW BUTT EXERCISES)

(Source: youtube.com)


 Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent. Bend forward at the hips so the torso is at parallel to the ground, holding a pair of dumbbells straight down with palms facing in. Next, with elbows slightly bent, raise the dumbbells out the side so that the elbows extend above the shoulders. Return to starting position.

 Stand with feet shoulder-width apart and knees slightly bent. Bend forward at the hips so the torso is at parallel to the ground, holding a pair of dumbbells straight down with palms facing in. Next, with elbows slightly bent, raise the dumbbells out the side so that the elbows extend above the shoulders. Return to starting position.

(Source: greatist.com, via the-exercist)

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!
2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.
3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.
4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.
5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.
6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.
7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.
8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.
9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.
SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252

thehealthycook:

1) SPEND TIME EACH WEEK LOOKING FOR RECIPES.
This may feel like an indulgence, but just let yourself do it. Browse blogs and websites for recipes that look delicious. Hang out on Tasteologie. Pile up some cookbooks and reach fo the sticky notes. Get inspired!

2) CREATE A PLACE TO SAVE YOUR RECIPES, and keep it SIMPLE. Do whatever works for you. Don’t get caught up in a system, just use whatever works best and most easily. Personally, I like Pinterest because it’s easy to visually browse what I’ve saved. (Watch for another post coming soon with a rundown of our readers’ favorite places to save recipes.

3) ASK OTHERS WHAT THEY WANT TO EAT. Like. your partner, family, and roommates. This might sound obvious, but it’s easy to get caught up in our weeks and forget to ask our households what they would like to eat. I get extra inspired, too, when I feel like I’m cooking a meal as a gift — trying to please and delight the palate of someone I love.

4) KEEP A MEAL JOURNAL. One of my best inspirations is my own record of things I’ve cooked in the past. Take a look at what you were cooking a year ago, two years ago. It’s a good way to remember things you used to cook, and still love.

5) START A CALENDAR. Now that you’re getting inspired in what to eat, start a calendar of what you’d like to cook over the next few days or few weeks. It can be as organized as a Google Calendar, with notes on each day for that day’s menu. Or you can just jot notes to yourself in the corner of your laptop screen. The important thing is to write it down.

6) GO WITH THEME NIGHTS. (soup night, pasta night, beans). I find find it really helpful to have a theme night each week. This doesn’t work for everyone, but it may be especially helpful for those with kids. Keeping the focus narrow will help you and your household make quick recipe decisions.

7) CHOOSE A SHOPPING DAY AND MAKE A LIST. A lot of the readers who seemed to have success in meal planning shopped very purposefully. They looked at their recipes and made a shopping list. Some of the meal planning and recipe-saving services let you do this easily, extracting ingredients from the recipes you have saved.

8) CHECK WHATS ON SALE. Some people really like to organize their meals around sales. Is organic chicken a dollar off this week? Or canned chickpeas? Check out your grocery store circular and adjust your meal plan or shopping list a bit.

9) PLAN FOR LEFTOVERS. Most of us have at least some tolerance for leftovers. I regularly cook one or two big healthy casseroles at the beginning of the week and eat off them all week long for lunch. Some people can only eat leftovers for a single night. Either way, try to make your cooking always do double duty. Make a little extra of everything, and if you don’t want it right away, freeze it.

SOURCE:
http://www.thekitchn.com/10-tips-for-better-weekly-meal-planning-reader-intelligence-report-177252

(via deadliftdolly)

the-exercist:

Great article about runner Julie Creffield:

“Despite my size 18 frame I am a runner,” she wrote on the Huffington Post. “I have in fact been a runner for the last ten years running everything from 5k fun runs to full marathons. I run because I love the feeling of running, I love the community of runners where I have made many friends, but I admit I also run to keep control of my weight, and to help me lead a healthier and happier life.”
She has recently launched the website Too Fat To Run which will provide first-time runners with the resources, including safety tips, to make their dreams a reality. The site will also sell merchandise, because, you know, you got to keep the lights on. Actually, one of the coolest things “Too Fat To Run” is doing, merch-wise, is selling runners apparel that provides a range of sizes for plus-sizers (most fitness wear does not clothe women past a size 16 or 18). The idea is to be able to make this business profitable enough to make “stylish, sexy, technical apparel” for plus-sized athletes.
"What we need are practical solutions where women feel empowered to be more active and where exercise is seen as something enjoyable and fun rather than a chore and something we must do."
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