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freshcleanfit:

A few months ago I made this post with wintry animals, but now it is summertime and here are some summer-loving animals checking in on you! be good to yourselves! :)

(via nyx-terpsichore)

startersteps:

Shaking Off “Gymtimidation”
If you’re making a new commitment to exercise, you’ll probably be active around other people, and that can cause anxiety. You may worry because you have a large weight-loss goal, get winded easily, or you can’t lift much weight. You may even have been the target of mean-spirited comments from others.
Unfortunately, the world has a generous helping of jerks in it. You still have to look out for yourself, and that may mean getting a little uncomfortable. Here are some suggestions to ease the way:
Wear earphones while you exercise: Well, not if you’re riding a bike outside, but then you’ll be sailing past any haters, anyway. Especially in the gym, though earphones — plus favorite music, a great (or just plain fun) audiobook, or some podcasts from a favorite show — can help you tune out the world and focus on your workout. Music has even been shown to enhance performance.
Map out a plan before you hit the gym: Know exactly what you’re doing before you get to the gym. It could be as simple as a list of exercises you want to do, or as complicated as the order and other details about them. Bonus: you have a checklist to help you see what you’re accomplishing while you’re there. (And keeping a log of your activities, even if it’s just dated lists in a manila folder, can help you stick with your plan and improve it, too. Here are some ideas for things you can keep track of.)
It’s really true: the people who matter don’t mind, and the people who mind don’t matter. Sometimes the gym seems like an obstacle course of people who are better at everything and eyeing you critically. Appearances can be deceiving. The most capable, consistent, and knowledgeable gym-goers are almost always friendly, enthusiastic, and interested in helping others share their enjoyment of exercise. In other words, the best people help build others up — they don’t tear others down.
Exactly how fast you move or how much you lift doesn’t mean much outside of formal competition. For almost all of us, the most important part is whether we can do more — or feel better — than we did yesterday, or last week or last year. No human will ever beat a cheetah in a sprint, but that’s OK, because our job is being good humans. (And when the distances get longer, the tables turn!) This is one reason it helps to find activities you enjoy. Enjoying your exercise makes it easier to focus on what’s really important: how you are getting better over time.
This is clearly an image from an ad campaign (others in this style include a swimmer racing a dolphin and a soccer player facing off against a spider goal-tender), but I don’t know the source — please let me know if you recognize it!
Do you have some favorite tips and tricks for keeping your focus?

startersteps:

Shaking Off “Gymtimidation”

If you’re making a new commitment to exercise, you’ll probably be active around other people, and that can cause anxiety. You may worry because you have a large weight-loss goal, get winded easily, or you can’t lift much weight. You may even have been the target of mean-spirited comments from others.

Unfortunately, the world has a generous helping of jerks in it. You still have to look out for yourself, and that may mean getting a little uncomfortable. Here are some suggestions to ease the way:

  • Wear earphones while you exercise: Well, not if you’re riding a bike outside, but then you’ll be sailing past any haters, anyway. Especially in the gym, though earphones — plus favorite music, a great (or just plain fun) audiobook, or some podcasts from a favorite show — can help you tune out the world and focus on your workout. Music has even been shown to enhance performance.
  • Map out a plan before you hit the gym: Know exactly what you’re doing before you get to the gym. It could be as simple as a list of exercises you want to do, or as complicated as the order and other details about them. Bonus: you have a checklist to help you see what you’re accomplishing while you’re there. (And keeping a log of your activities, even if it’s just dated lists in a manila folder, can help you stick with your plan and improve it, too. Here are some ideas for things you can keep track of.)
  • It’s really true: the people who matter don’t mind, and the people who mind don’t matter. Sometimes the gym seems like an obstacle course of people who are better at everything and eyeing you critically. Appearances can be deceiving. The most capable, consistent, and knowledgeable gym-goers are almost always friendly, enthusiastic, and interested in helping others share their enjoyment of exercise. In other words, the best people help build others up — they don’t tear others down.

Exactly how fast you move or how much you lift doesn’t mean much outside of formal competition. For almost all of us, the most important part is whether we can do more — or feel better — than we did yesterday, or last week or last year. No human will ever beat a cheetah in a sprint, but that’s OK, because our job is being good humans. (And when the distances get longer, the tables turn!) This is one reason it helps to find activities you enjoy. Enjoying your exercise makes it easier to focus on what’s really important: how you are getting better over time.

This is clearly an image from an ad campaign (others in this style include a swimmer racing a dolphin and a soccer player facing off against a spider goal-tender), but I don’t know the source — please let me know if you recognize it!

Do you have some favorite tips and tricks for keeping your focus?

(via the-exercist)

hotmessyogi:

I need to tell you all something. Dropping unhealthy habits can improve your physical health, but dropping the dead weight in you life changes your mental health drastically. And what I mean by that is the negative people in your life. The ones that hold you back and make it so that you feel less than wonderful. I dropped some massive dead weight in my life in January this year and I have never felt/looked better. People see the confidence increase and the bright and shiny person you become. Be kind to yourself and drop the people that bring you down.

ashleywhispers:

One of the raw shots I got of today’s rehearsal, coached by the amazing Cynthia Gregory. #ballet #princetondance #abt #myidol

ashleywhispers:

One of the raw shots I got of today’s rehearsal, coached by the amazing Cynthia Gregory. #ballet #princetondance #abt #myidol

tonyhart101:

Fish! #nbsi14 #ballet

tonyhart101:

Fish! #nbsi14 #ballet

carlosquezadaph:

Elisa Carrillo & Friends . México . Ballet Gala 

Don Quixote 

Iana Salenko & Dinu Tamazlacaru / Staatsballet Berlin Principals

Fotografía Carlos Quezada

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